NASA Logo, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

+NASA Home

+Ames Home

Neha Rungta and Adrian Agogino Present at 2014 International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems
Intelligent Systems Division Banner

Neha Rungta and Adrian Agogino Present at 2014 International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems

Neha Rungta and Adrian Agogino presented one full paper and two short papers at the 13th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (AAMAS). These papers describe work on agent systems and how they can be used to improve aviation safety. Neha’s work defines a mechanism to reason about beliefs in agents and how potential hazards may arise due to a lack of situational awareness in the cockpit. Adrian’s work shows how multi-agent optimization can be used to reduce en-route congestion levels in the national airspace. AAMAS is the premier international agents conference. AAMAS accepted only 23% of submissions for full papers, and only 22% for short papers.

BACKGROUND: This work is part of the Robust Software Engineering Group's effort to use learning agents and verification of multi-agent systems to improve aviation safety. Neha works on modeling and verifying human-machine interactions in the context of civil aviation. The focus of the work has been to verify properties related to authority and autonomy when humans are interacting with complex automated systems. Adrian’s work on multi-agent systems and learning provides robust solutions to numerous complex design and control problems. These learning systems can be adaptive, and can generate control solutions to complex structures too complicated to be designed by hand.

COLLABORATORS: William Curran and Kagan Tumer (both with Oregon State University); Giuseppe Primiero and Franco Raimondi (both with Middlesex University)

NASA PROGRAM FUNDING: Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD)

Contact: Adrian Agogino, Neha Rungta

First Gov logo
NASA Logo - nasa.gov