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Eleanor Rieffel Gives Invited Talk at Frontiers in Quantum Coherent Science Event
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Eleanor Rieffel Gives Invited Talk at Frontiers in Quantum Coherent Science Event

Eleanor Rieffel gave an invited talk at Frontiers in Quantum Coherent Science: An Inaugural Celebration of the Center for Quantum Coherent Science at UC Berkeley. Her talk, “A NASA Perspective on Quantum Computing: Opportunities and Challenges”, should soon be available online at the Center's Site.

A related publication has recently been accepted for publication in the journal Parallel Computing, “A NASA Perspective on Quantum Computing: Opportunities and Challenges”: Rupak Biswas, Zhang Jiang, Kostya Kechezhi, Sergey Knysh, Salvatore Mandra, Bryan O’Gorman, Alejandro Perdomo-Ortiz, Andre Petukhov, JohnRealpe-Gomez, Eleanor Rieffel, Davide Venturelli, Fedir Vasko, and Zhihui Wang.

We are happy to provide copies to interested parties.

BACKGROUND: From the intro to our paper: “In the last couple of decades, the world has seen several stunning instances of quantum algorithms that provably outperform the best classical algorithms. For most problems, however, it is currently unknown whether quantum algorithms can provide an advantage, and if so by how much, or how to design quantum algorithms that realize such advantages. Many of the most challenging computational problems arising in the practical world are tackled today by heuristic algorithms that have not been mathematically proven to outperform other approaches, but have been shown to be effective empirically. While quantum heuristic algorithms have been proposed, empirical testing becomes possible only as quantum computation hardware is built. The next few years will be exciting as empirical testing of quantum heuristic algorithms becomes more and more feasible. While large-scale universal quantum computers are likely decades away, special-purpose quantum computational hardware has begun to emerge that will become more powerful over time, as well as some small-scale universal quantum computers.”

About the Cener for Quantum Coherent Science (CQSC): From their website, “The Center for Quantum Coherent Science at UC Berkeley is an intellectual nexus that explores the richness, complexity, and practical application of quantum mechanics, quantum states, and quantum systems. CQCS pulls together scientists from the sub-fields of atomic and optical physics, condensed-matter physics, quantum information science, and high-energy and string theory and houses them all under one roof. But the real strength of Berkeley’s Center for Quantum Coherent Science is its community of students and postdoctoral researchers, young scientists who are developing their unique perspective on scientific work in an interdisciplinary environment. By providing an expansive new forum for investigating the complexities of quantum science and its practical applications, the potential for new scientific discoveries and technological advances is immense. They range from quantum computers and simulators capable of solving classically intractable problems — including the description and synthesis of complex materials — to secure communications hardware and new types of coherent sensors with unparalleled resolution.”

NASA PROGRAM FUNDING: We acknowledge support from the NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program, Human Exploration and Operations Directorate (HEOMD); and NASA Ames Research Center. This work was also supported in part by the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) Information Directorate, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

TEAM MEMBERS AND COLLABORATORS: Rupak Biswas, Zhang Jiang, Kostya Kechezhi, Sergey Knysh, Salvatore Mandra, Bryan O'Gorman, Alejandro Perdomo-Ortiz, Andre Petukhov, John Realpe-Gomez, Eleanor Rieffel, Fedir Vasko, Davide Venturelli, and Zhihui Wang

POINT OF CONTACT: Eleanor Rieffel, eleanor.g.rieffel@nasa.gov

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