NASA Logo, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

+NASA Home

+Ames Home

Advanced Control and Evolvable Systems Researchers Receive 6 NASA Ames 2016 Technology Transfer Awards
Intelligent Systems Division Banner

Advanced Control and Evolvable Systems Researchers Receive 6 NASA Ames 2016 Technology Transfer Awards

The Advanced Control and Evolvable Systems (ACES) group received 6 NASA Ames Technology Transfer Awards on January 19, 2017 for aircraft flight control technology development and Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellite (SPHERES) software. The awards include 2 patent awards, 2 patent application awards, and 2 software release awards.

  • U.S. Patent 9,296,474, “Control Systems with Normalized and Covariance Adaptation by Optimal Control Modification” - Nhan Nguyen, John Burken (NASA AFRC), and Curtis Hanson (NASA AFRC)
  • U.S. Patent 9,227,721, “Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control” - Nhan Nguyen
  • Patent Application, “Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion” - Nhan Nguyen, Kevin Reynolds, and Eric Ting
  • Patent Application, “Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control” - Nhan Nguyen
  • Software Release, “Control Allocation Technique to Recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations (CAPIO) Through the Estimation and Minimization of Phase Lag Introduced to the System Due to Control Surface Rate Saturation” - Diana Acosta, Steven Beard, Robert Craun, Gordon Hardy, Ilya Kolmanovsky (University of Michigan), Michael Leonard, Michael Weinstein, and Yildiray Yildiz
  • Software Release, “SPHERES GUI Version 6” - Jonathan Barlow, Ken Oyadomari, and Cedric Priscal

BACKGROUND: Optimal Control Modification (OCM) is an adaptive flight control technology that has been flight validated on NASA F-18 aircraft in 2010 and 2011 at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC). Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap is a novel flight control actuator developed in 2010 for drag minimization and aeroservoelastic control of flexible wing aircraft. Wing-shaping control using distributed propulsion is a new flight control method that leverages the future possibility of electric or hybrid distributed propulsion to change wing shape to improve fuel efficiency. Control Allocation Technique to Recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations (CAPIO) is a flight control technology that can reduce adverse effects of pilot induced oscillations caused by actuator rate saturation. Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) is a suite of free flying satellite testbeds deployed in the International Space Station for flight experimentation made available to NASA and other researchers around the U.S.

NASA PROGRAM FUNDING: Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) project, Advanced Air Vehicles Program (AAVP), Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD); Technology Demonstration Missions (TDM) program, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD)

TEAMS: Optimal Control Modification - Nhan Nguyen, John Burken, and Curtis Hanson; Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces - Nhan Nguyen; Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion - Nhan Nguyen, Kevin Reynolds, and Eric Ting; CAPIO - Diana Acosta, Steven Beard, Robert Craun, Gordon Hardy, Ilya Kolmanovsky, Michael Leonard, Michael Weinstein, and Yildiray Yildiz; SPHERES - Jonathan Barlow, Ken Oyadomari, and Cedric Priscal

POINT OF CONTACT: Diana Acosta - CAPIO, diana.m.acosta@nasa.gov; Jose Benavides - SPHERES, jose.v.benavides@nasa.gov; and Nhan Nguyen – control systems and wing-shaping technologies, nhan.t.nguyen@nasa.gov

First Gov logo
NASA Logo - nasa.gov