Presentation on Tensegrity Robots for Planetary Exploration

March 21 2013

Last week Adrian and I (Vytas SunSpiral) presented our work on “Super Ball Bot” a tensegrity robot for planetary landing and exploration, at the NIAC (NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts) Program’s Spring Symposium. It was really fun to share all the progress we have made in the mission concept development and engineering analysis. The best aspect of this is that our work is supporting our initial intuition that this concept is workable and not as crazy as it initially sounded. Luckily for us, the NIAC program is designed to try out these high risk, but high pay-off, concepts for new technologies for space exploration. Thus, when the BBC interviewed us, we took it as a good sign that they called us “NASA’s crazy robot lab.” Balancing that view, Tech Buzzer called us “Not actually crazy. But certainly innovative and ambitious.” And while the Tech Buzzer article has many factual errors, they are right about the innovation and ambition — we are developing an idea that has never been tried before, and if it works (which we think it will — with a lot more hard work), then it could change the future of robotics and space exploration.

Watch the video below to find out more, and see my earlier post where I first described the project when we started (much has evolved since then!).

Watch live streaming video from niac2013 at livestream.com

Since I mentioned some of the media attention we have received, we also got covered by Time right after the project was announced.

(This is a repost from Vytas SunSpirals Personal Blog)

This entry was posted on Thursday, March 21st, 2013 at 7:29 pm and is filed under Tensegrity. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URI.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

  • Measuring Lake Tahoe from Space

    This fall, the crisis mapping team extended their work on flood mapping to measure the water level of Lake Tahoe over time ... more

  • Flood Mapping with Adaboost

    The Crisis Mapping team recently wrapped up our research on flood mapping. Previously, we evaluated existing MODIS flood mapping algorithms across a diverse range ... more

  • Crisis Mapping Toolkit Released

    We are excited to announce the open source release of the Crisis Mapping Toolkit under the Apache 2.0 license! The ... more